About

Cary P., Freelance Editor

Hello, I’m Cary.

I am a freelance editor and I love my job; in my spare time, I post professional writing and publishing tips here on the Friendly Editor. (Check out my posts by category to get started.)

If You’re Interested in Working with Me

I edit at all levels—developmental, line, and copy—and have worked in many genres, including young adult, self-help, memoir, historical fiction, suspense, and women’s fiction. I have also curated literary agent databases, edited nonfiction proposals, and helped clients write cover letters and resumes.

Why No Posted Prices?

I don’t list editing prices, or even editing packages, because I’d much rather tailor my services to your unique needs and the needs of your manuscript. If you’d like to chat about your work in progress, you can email me here.

Some Background on Me and My Blog

Throughout my career I have been lucky to work with some exceptionally talented editors:

  • Lourdes Venard was my copyediting instructor at the University of California, San Diego.
  • Barbara Sjoholm, founder of the Author-Editor Clinic, helped me hone my developmental editing skills.
  • And Stuart Horwitz brought me on board as an editor at his top-notch book editing firm, Book Architecture.

I was honored to have the Friendly Editor recognized as one of the “101 Best Websites for Writers” by Writer’s Digest, the number one writing magazine in the US.

In addition to editing, I have also mentored writing students at my high school alma mater, and I have contributed to two writing books: Book Architecture and Finish Your Book in Three Drafts.

Want to Know More?

If you have a question about writing or publishing that I haven’t addressed in previous posts, feel free to email me.

Happy writing!

Note: The Friendly Editor is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for me to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites. That being said, however, I only link to books I have actually read and truly enjoyed.

21 thoughts on “About

  1. Thank you so much for the great blog. This is one of the most informative, with a slick presentation style and critical detail that I gobbled up quickly. I’ve read some posts several times ensuring I absorbed all the information you presented. Again — a genuine thank you!

    Like

    1. This made my day, MJ! I’m sorry my thank you is so very belated – it certainly doesn’t reflect how much I appreciate your comment. I ended up taking an unexpected sabbatical over the summer, but I’m looking forward to getting back to it this Fall. Sometimes blogging can feel a bit lonely and thankless (ironically – since we blog in order to feel connected to others) so it’s always so gratifying to know that I’ve helped someone. I hope your writing is going well and please check in again!

      Like

  2. I’ve just spent a couple of hours devouring the contents of this site. Thrilled to have found it (via Storyfix) and couldn’t click on ‘follow’ fast enough. Thank you!

    Like

    1. What a lovely way to start my Monday morning – thank you, Ruth! I have some great stuff I’ll be adding to the blog, hopefully soon (whatever doesn’t make it into the chapter I’m co-authoring with Stuart Horwitz for his second book on writing fiction). I love hearing from fellow writers so please feel free to drop in again!

      Like

  3. Neat blog, but can I ask what books you have written and published that give you the credentials to instruct? Not meaning to offend, but I see so many books and blogs on writing that are written by people who have not written or published anything of merit. This is one of the reasons I think highly of K.M. Weilands blog and non-fiction books on writing – she has actually walked the walk. I couldn’t find anything on Amazon by C.S. Plocher. Perhaps you write under a pen name? Looking forward to your response.

    Like

    1. No offense taken, Dan. I understand why you feel like I need to have credentials to write about writing. I discussed my point of view on the subject here: thefriendlyeditor.com/2015/06/03/amateur-writer/. I think that, in the end, what matters most is your gut reaction to whatever it is you’re reading. If your gut reaction is that you like it, then I say that you should trust yourself and not worry about what other people say. At any rate, thanks for dropping in and I hope to hear from you again!

      Like

  4. Hey! I’ve been writing since i was seven but only now have i realised why i dont like my stories as much as i would like to. Your blog is wonderful and it helps me understand what actually makes a book. Thank you so much, you gave me inspiration to write again:) May the new year give you many fresh ideas 😀

    Like

  5. I fully understand what you are doing with your blog and it is a very helpful resource. You give credit where credit is due and point people to good books that help them with their writing craft. Pay no attention to people like Dan who require credentials to learn and keep up the good work.

    Like

    1. Thanks so much, fellow writer, for taking the time to drop me a line of encouragement. I’m always incredibly appreciative and in awe of the supportive writing community on this blog. I hope to hear from you again!

      Like

  6. I found your blog actually searching on how to write like Rowling….because I can’t stop reading Harry Potter….continually trying to figure out how she strung out such an intricate plot and kept track of all those characters etc. You’ve done all the work for me! I also bought some of the books you recommended….Story Engineering is particularly helpful! And I’m loving Getting Into Character and Please Understand Me II. My writing is really going much deeper. Thank you so much for the helpful blog posts and recommendations!

    Like

    1. I’m so glad that my blog has been useful to you, Carrie. I love meeting other writers who are interested in the same stuff as I am! Keep on writing and stay in touch!

      Like

  7. I’ve just subscribed this blog.
    I’m loving it everyday this being my fifth day confused where to start as every article triggers my nerve to start writing.
    Thank u so much

    Like

    1. Thanks for leaving a comment, Abi. It’s always nice to hear that my blog has resonated with another writer—that’s what I love most about blogging: connecting with other writers. Keep on writing and check in again soon!

      Like

  8. This is a FANTASTIC BLOG!!!! I am so happy that I stumbled across it! I’m in the process of writing my first novel, and have been mapping out the story structure of popular fiction to help understand the cadence of storytelling. You have saved me SO MUCH WORK!!!! THANK YOU!!!!!!!

    Like

  9. Hi Cary, I find your posts full of insight :0) Would you mind expounding on how effective Red Herrings are constructed within a narrative, and perhaps touch on how they may be integrated within say, the Setup and Pay off technique? There was a great post you did on subtle placing of key clues for setups planted for surprising payoffs and twists down the line, ie. Harry experiencing pain in his scar while looking at Snape past Quirrell in book 1. Mystery narratives such as Harry Potter extensively use of Red Herrings but I also feel like I’m missing nuances of the method to which I’m not quite privy too… for ex. how to make the Red Herrings actually contribute to the primary narrative drive of the plot, instead of derailing it or making the reader feel like it was an waste-of-time detour, and the like. Also, Red Herrings that may go across books at the Series levels and how to make that seamlessly work. Thank you so much!

    Like

Comments are closed.